Archive for November, 2015

Harnack in English

Adolf von Harnack was one of the most significant theologians of the latter 19th and early 20th centuries. The definitive listing of his bibliography runs to over 1600 items. In his day, he was also something of a theological celebrity, and his works (liberal in social outlook, critical in character, but in certain ways traditional as well – at least when it came to the NT) were translated into English with a volume that few can match. I drew up the following list of translated works, but I’m sure there must be things I’ve missed, particularly in the periodical literature.

Books

  1. Marcion: The Gospel of the Alien God (partial transl. by John E. Steely and Lyle D. Bierma; Labyrinth, 1990; repr. Wipf & Stock, 2007)
  2. M. Rumscheidt, ed., Adolf von Harnack: Liberal Theology at its Height (Making of Modern Theology 6; San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1989). A selection of excerpts and shorter writings from Harnack.
  3. Militia Christi: The Christian Religion and the Military in the First Three Centuries (trans. David McI. Gracie; Philadelphia: Fortress, 1981)
  4. The Mission and Expansion of Christianity in the First Three Centuries (trans. J. Moffatt; New York: Harper & Row, 1962): vol. 12
  5. The Origin of the New Testament and the Most Important Consequences of the New Creation (trans. J. R. Wilkinson; New York: Macmillan, 1925)
  6. What is Christianity? (trans. Thomas Bailey Saunders; London: Williams & Norgate, 1902 [and often reprinted])
  7. Bible Reading in the Early Church (trans. J. R. Wilkinson; Crown Theological Library 36; London: Williams & Norgate, 1912)
  8. The Acts of the Apostles (trans. J. R. Wilkinson; London: Williams & Norgate, 1909)
  9. With Wilhelm Hermann, Essays on the Social Gospel (trans. G. M. Craik; Crown Theological Library 18; New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1907)
  10. Luke the Physician: The Author of the Third Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles (trans. J. R. Wilkinson; London: Williams & Norgate, 1908)
  11. The Sayings of Jesus: The Second Source of St. Matthew and St. Luke (trans. J. R. Wilkinson; London: Williams &  Norgate, 1908)
  12. The Date of the Acts and of the Synoptic Gospels (trans. J. R. Wilkinson; London: Williams & Norgate, 1911)
  13. Monasticism: Its Ideals and History and the Confessions of St Augustine: Two Lectures (trans. E. E. Kellett and F. H. Marseille; Williams & Norgate, 1901)
  14. The Constitution of Law of the Church in the First Two Centuries (trans. F. L. Pogson; London: Williams & Norgate, 1910)
  15. History of Dogma (trans. by N. Buchanan; Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1896-99): vol. 1234567
  16. Outlines of the History of Dogma (trans. E. K. Mitchell; New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1893)
  17. Christianity and History (trans. Thomas Bailey Saunders; London: Adam & Charles Black, 1896)
  18. The Apostle’s Creed (trans. Stewart Means and Thomas Bailey Saunders; London: Adam and Charles Black, 1901)
  19. Sources of the Apostolic Canons: With a Treatise on the Origin of the Readership and Other Lower Orders (trans. L. A. Wheatley; London: Adam and Charles Black, 1895)
  20. Thoughts on the Present Position of Protestantism (trans. Thomas Bailey Saunders; London: Adam & Charles Black, 1899)

Articles and Essays 

  1. Pro Domo,” Outlook (28 April 1894)
  2. “Martin Luther, the Prophet of the Reformation,” in The Prophets of the Christian Faith (by various authors; New York: Macmillan, 1896), 107–122; also here
  3. “Newer Roman Catholic Church History,” Lutheran Church Review 18 (1899): 393–95
  4. “Authorship of the Epistle to the Hebrews,” Lutheran Church Review 19 (1900): 448-471
  5. Contribution to The Atonement in Modern Religious Thought: A Theological Symposium (New York: Thomas Whittaker, 1901), originally appeared in The Christian World 
  6. “The Kaiser’s Letter on Christ and Revelation,” Methodist Quarterly Review 52 no. 3 (1903): 565–70
  7. “Time of Christ’s Crucifixion,” Lutheran Church Review 29 (1910): 73–75
  8. “The ‘sic et non’ of Stephan’s Gobarus,” Harvard Theological Review 16 no. 3 (1923): 205–34
  9. Appendix: Analysis and Historical Appraisal of the Enchiridion,” in Enchiridion on Faith, Hope, and Love (ed. Thomas S. Hibbs; Regency, 1961), 142ff.
  10. “The Relevance of Theological Faculties at the University,” Christian Scholar 47 no. 3 (1964): 208–20″
  11. “The Old Testament in the Pauline Letters and in the Pauline Communities,” in B. S. Rosner, ed., Understanding Paul’s Ethics: Twentieth Century Approaches (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995), 27–49

Correspondence

  1. With Karl Barth: Continuum 7 no. 1 (1969): 195–212
  2. With Erik Peterson: “Erik Peterson’s Correspondence with Adolf von Harnack,” Pro Ecclesia 2 no. 3 (1993): 333–44
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Q in Wellhausen’s pre-1880 OT Scholarship

In a previous post, I had noted that Q was used as an abbreviation for Quelle in pre-1880 geography books, and suggested this as a longshot hypothetical background to the adoption of the siglum in NT studies. Perhaps something more relevant came to my attention today, even if it is nearly as speculative. In reading John Rogerson’s learned book on the development of Old Testament scholarship in England and Germany in the 19th century, I was struck by the fact that Wellhausen used ‘Q’ as a siglum for a hypothetical source of the Pentateuch in an 1876 article on ‘Die Composition des Hexateuchs,” in the Jahrbuch für Deutsche Theologie although Wellhausen used it as an abbreviation for ‘quatuor’ rather than for Quelle. He writes, “Ich habe für die s.g. Grundschrift das Zeichen Q gewählt, als Abkürzung für Vierbundesbuch (quatuor), welchen Namen ich als den passendsten für sie vorschlage” (392: ‘I have chosen the siglum Q as an abbreviation for the so-called Grundschrift, which stands for the ‘four-covenant book’ (quatuor) which name I propose as the most appropriate for it’).

Admittedly it’s not exact, but might this have primed the NT world to think of Q as standing for a hypothetical biblical source behind the canonical accounts? Pure speculation, but a strikingly analogous designation and function.

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